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US M14 7.62mm Rifle

  • The Vietnam War
  • 1 min

By Crusader1307

The US Model 14  7.62mm Rifle was the replacement for the long-lived, US M-1 Garand Battle Rifle, used with great success during World War II and The Korean War. First introduced in 1959 to American Military Forces, some Soldiers heralded it as one of America's finest Battle Rifles. The M-14 us often considered by Historians as the last "true" Battle Rifle produced by The United States. It used the NATO  (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), 7.62mm Round. Over 1 Million were produced for use. Weighing 11-pounds, The M-14 was 45-inches long and was a gas-operated, rotating bolt weapon. It also featured a 12-inch under barrel fixed Bayonet. The original M-14 featured a completely wooden stock. A Carbine version was produced with us still produced for Civilian use, known as a "mini" M-14.

 

Featuring a 20-round metal ammunition clip, The M-14 had a cyclic rate of 700-rounds per minute with an effective range of 500 to 900-yards. The Rifle's "demise" was a direct relation to The Vietnam War. Considered too long for Jungle Warfare, even it's wooden stock was prone to rot due to climate conditions. Despite attempts to redesign the stock in fiberglass, it would be replaced by The M-16 Rifle by 1965-1966. For a very brief period of time, The M-14 saw active use in Southeast Asia. Although officially retired, versions of The M-14 would go on to form the basis of one of America's best Sniper Rifles, The M-21. Using National Match components, The M-21 is still in Inventory. Currently, The M-14 is still used in many Ceremonial Guard Units.