Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake Snowflake

British Livens Flame Projector

  • World War I
  • 1 min

By Crusader1307

As Germany was creating a field effective Flamethrower (more or less), the need for a similar weapons was needed by The Allies. The Livens Flame Projector was one such experiment. Designed by British Engineering Officer William Livens, The Projector was actually built (4 of them), and they were deployed by British Forces at The Battle of The Somme (1916). The Projector was 56 feet long and weighed over 2 tons. A “crew” of 300 men were needed to transport and assemble The Projector. In practice, a long tunnel was created under the perimeter between lines (known as “No Man's Land”). A long tube was ran through the tunnel, which was connected to the compressed gas cylinders. When ignited, a pressurized wall of flame would be created (from the ground up). It was moderately effective (but require too much work to be pursued after the War as a viable device).