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British Lancaster Mark I Machine Gun

  • World War II
  • 1 min

By Crusader1307

An advanced version of The Sten Gun, The Lancaster was a quality made  (and quite expensive), weapon developed by the British Army, during World War II. The Lancaster was adopted primarily for use by The Royal Navy (and later, Royal Marines). Expensive to produce and requiring Gunsmiths to had mill certain parts, only 8,000 were produced between 1941 to 1943. The Lancaster was actually composed of modified Enfield and other weapons. Noted for it's brass action and magazine port, the metal components were treated to be resistant to salt water corrosion. The Lancaster Machine Gun weighed 12 pounds and was nearly 3 feet long. Machine fir a 9mm round, The Lancaster was also able to chamber Sten Gun ammunition magazines. The Standard magazine for The Lancaster was a 50 round clip. The weapon was able to maintain a cyclic rate of 600 rpm. The Lancaster had a maximum effective range of 200 meters. The Lancaster was even fitted with the M1907 Bayonet (for close quarters combat). So successful on a small deployment of the weapon, Germany designed it's own version (based on captured versions). They identified it as The Bergman MP-18. The Lancaster would see it's most historic use when deployed with The Royal Marines who landed at Normandy (1944). Despite it's cost, The Lancaster was kept in the British Arms inventory well into the 1960s. Some versions had made their way into the jungles of Southeast Asia. The Lancaster was finally retired in 1979.