USMC Service Sword

  • General History
  • 1 min

By Crusader1307

Adopted in 1859 as the official Field Sword of The United States Marine Corps, this blade is considered the oldest continuous issued “weapon” in US Military inventory. Largely unchanged since it's adoption, the Model 1859 Field Sword is designed in 2 versions. One is for Officers and the other for Non-Commissioned Officers. It is used today for drill and ceremony purposes (and not as a personal defense weapon, as it was originally intended). The Field Sword is often confused with the prized Mameluke Saber (originally given as a reward for The Marines intervention in The Barbary Pirates War of the 1820s), many Marine Officers favor that over the US Field issue (with NCOs favoring the US issue). The blades (as of 1875), are etched with Naval Battle scenes. The blades are commonly around 36 to 38 inches in length and are single-edged (still sharpened today as opposes to most US Military Presentation and Drill swords). They are slightly curved with a Brass Hilt (wrapped in leather. The scabbards are traditionally leather wrapped with brass mounts for attachments to a hanger-belt system. Early versions of these scabbards were wooden (being replaced by steel housings). The last change to the blade was in 1918 (making it somewhat less wide).