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Lord_Chris

Monsters and Myth!

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''LUCINA''

Roman Goddess associated with Childbirth and Women in Labor – ''Lucina'' may have been related to several Ancient Greek Goddesses of the same abilities. She lived among a ''sacred grove'' of Lotus Trees atop The Esquiline Hill (one of Rome's ''7 Sacred Hills''). Proper veneration before Childbirth ensured a Woman would have little pain in delivery. This was made so by drinking a fluid culled from the sacred Leaves, which ''killed pain''.

 

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''BAISHE NIANGNIANG''

From ancient China, The ''Baishe Niangniang'' was a Goddess which was portrayed as a ''immortal'' Reptile, White Snake. Seen as magically powerful, Biashe was associated with the Celestial Bodies of both Earth and Moon. She was worshiped for Her abilities to provide healing during Lunar Events.

 

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''PAKHET''

A Goddess of Ancient Egypt – ''Pakhet'' was envisioned as a Part-Human, Part-Lioness Creature. She was associated with War and Warfare. Her name, translates to ''She Who Scratches''. A mainstay of The Middle Kingdom Period of 2,040 BC – Pakhet was also inclusive of Egyptian Funerary Rites for various Rulers.

 

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''EOPSIN''

Of Ancient Kortean Mythos – ''Eopsin'' was a Hybrid (Human and Snake Being), who was Patron of Wealth that was hidden. As such, if a Wealthy person hid their riches, Eopsin would be invoked to provide ''protection'' to such. As known, should a violator attempt to break into such ''hidden wealth'', often, poisonous snakes were placed to strike them down.

 

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''HESAT”

Seen as a ''Provider of Life'', ''Hesat'' was a Goddess portrayed as a Bovine Deity (such as Nandin). Her ''milk'' was seen as a ''fortifier'' and – as known, nurtured infants (hence, ''Giver of Life''). Her Cult dates to the 3rd BC in Ancient Egypt. She would be assimilated into the Cult of Hathor around the 1st BC.

 

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''RENENUTET''

Ancient Egyptian Mythology states that The Goddess ''Renenutet'' was Patron of The Nile Harvest. A Human-Snake Hybrid Deity, Renenutet was greatly feared and revered. Also associated with Fertility, She was Wife to The God Sobek.

 

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''ENDURSAGA''

According to Ancient Sumerian Texts, ''Endursaga'' was another Deity associated with their ''vetrsion'' of The Underworld. And while much of Endursaga is unknown (dating to 3,000 BC), He is seen as a ''powerful'' Demon of The Afterlife. Just ''what'' He was Patron of – is lost to time, but a few of His Shines have survived.

 

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''SHUPAE''

Deriving from Ancient Sumeria, ''Shupae'' had very nebulous beginnings. His Cut may alsom date to around 2,900 BC. Shupae was associated with The Sumerian Underworld, and may have also been akin to ''Hades'' and even ''Satan''. The Concept of ''Evil'' with regards to The Underworld – in particular ''The Underworld'', was much different in ancient Sumeria. Shupar may not have been as ''evil'' as once thought. He was also associated with The Planet Jupiter, and as such was seen as ''Lord'' of that ''Celestial Body'.

 

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