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Monsters and Myth!

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This thread is dedicated to myths, legends, monsters and everything in-between from the times of ancient Greece and before, to now! Prepare yourself for some of the most terrifying and amazing tales you have ever heard as @Crusader1307 and I post articles to amaze and bewilder!

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The fields have eyes, and the woods have ears.

⁠— Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: The Knight's Tale

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''THE BEAST OF GEVAUDEN''

Legend tells of this French Monster roaming Gevauden (modern day Lozere, France) between 1764 and 1767. Described by Authorities as an unusually large Wolf-like creature , it has been documented with having killed between 60 and 100 children and adults. Over 30 persons were seriously injured. The creature's modus operandi was to rip out it's victim's throats (or devour them), leaving bloody wreckage. So great was the creature's killing spree, that The French Government spent vast amounts of monies and materials (soldiers), searching for the creature. Said to weight 400 pounds and covered in a semi-long reddish fur, The Beast sported a long 5 foot tail (described as serpent-like) .King Louis XV sent 2 experienced Royal Huntsmen to Gevauden to finally rid the Region of this creature. On September 20, 1765 they succeeded in killing, what they described as a Eurasian Wolf . This beast was 130 pounds and some 6 feet long!. Light gray in color, it was reportedly stuffed and sent to King Louis. However, not long later......yet another attack!

This time (leaving nothing to chance), a local Hunter Jean Chastel, went to his local Priest and had several silver bullets blessed. He (like the Royal Hunters), went ''a looking'' for our beast. On June 19, 1767 he found the monster, a massive 6-foot long, red glowing eyed being in the woods of Gevauden. He fired. The beast fell dead. The killings and attacks stopped. Now logically, many modern Naturalists claim that the attacks were in fact caused by an obvious wolf pack (albeit large ones). Another theory was that Jean Chastel crossbred (and raised a larger than normal Great Mastif Hound), wishing to cash in on the 300 pieces of silver The King offered for the beast. But, one wonders....why did the killings stop AFTER a silver bullet was used.

 

                                                                           The_Beast_of_Gavauden.jpg

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''SPRING HEELED JACK''

A ''Story'' going back to 1830s England, ''Spring Heeled Jack'', was possibly one of the first Modern Urban Legends (one hopes). His myths goes from England to Scotland. The creature or man was seen to be 6 feet tall. His eyes glowed red with fire. His hands were bat-like claws. Wearing a tight, form-fitting black jumpsuit (he also was described as having wings) - Jack could  jump several hundred feet in the air. Covering immense distances, Jack also wore strange boots (some seeing spring-like attachments). Jack was known to try and steal babies and  slash or cut the faces and bodies of his victims. He was also known to breath out blue and white flames from his nose and mouth!. When Jack spoke, it was a language  unknown to the listener. A ''Jack Flap'' (mass sightings), were reported (and in some cases by respected persons)  from 1837 to 1838. Again, sightings rose in the 1870s. The last known Spring-Heeled Jack sighting was in 1904. What was he (or it ). Was he mass hysteria or early fodder for the notorious ''Penny Dreadful'' novels Policemen and Army Officers saw Jack. The Lord Mayor of London even claimed a sighting. Was Jack made up to spur tourism Or maybe a diversion for the poor and middle-class What do you think ?

 

                                                             Spring_Heeled_Jack.jpg

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''GHOUL''

Coming from The Middle East (originally), A ''Ghoul'' was an evil spirit who consumed human flesh (living and dead, it seems). Taking the form of a wild dog, it would lure away children or adult victims from Caravans  and consume them. Finally, they would take the form of their last meal (and wait for the next poor soul). In European terminology, we see the word Ghoul first appear in 1786 in the novel Vathek which chronicles this evil spirit as primarily being a graveyard dweller that eats the flesh of the dead. Often described throughout English Victorian Culture as being small, yet powerful beings that resembled the dead themselves, The Ghoul has been transformed into many different Countries myths and legends. They no doubt were the O.G. (not Original Gangstas but Original Ghouls) which created the time honored (and quite popular......Zombie!)

 

                                                                          Ghoul.jpg

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''THE BUNNY MAN''

From America comes ''The Bunny Man''. As the legend goes, in 1904 - The Clifton Asylum (Virginia), was slated to be closed down. A transport vehicle with 20 inmates was involved in a crash. The driver was killed - and all but 19 of the inmates were accounted for. A search by Police found no body. Soon after, in a stand of trees near a local train bridge, the carcasses of hundreds of dead rabbits were found strung up. Police were perplexed. This grisly practice continued for weeks. After another search of the woods near the train tunnel, the escaped inmate was found!. He had been trapping and living off the rabbits. After a heated chase, the Madman ran into an on-coming train to escape capture. The Police did not find any remains. Flash forward some years to 1970. Several young couples parking for pleasure near the secluded train bridge - reported having their cars attacked with an axe (while they were inside), by a strange man wearing (wait for it) - a rabbit suit. When the couples were shown a picture of the long dead inmate (again, wait for it)  they identified the photo as their attacker! By the way, the original Bunny Man was put in the Asylum for killing and butchering his family  on Easter!

 

                                                                           The_Bunny_Man.jpg

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''THE FLYING DUTCHMAN''

A Sailor's Ghost Story going back to at least the 18th Century (by some accounts), The Legend of ''The Flying Dutchman'' is as enduring as The Sea's History. Most seafaring Countries have their haunted ship stories. The Dutchman story (having been popularized by most Mediums, Opera and EVEN several Film adaptations)  is timeless. To see The Dutchman was a bad omen. To have contact with her was doom. Citing an 1821 account of The Dutchman, the legend (or curse), goes as such: ''Sailing from Amsterdam, Captain Vanderdecken was a determined Ship Master. His Brig, ''The Dutchman'' - was well known. Declaring he could sail 'round The Cape of Good Hope in record time, he ran into gale force winds that greatly hindered his time. Storming The ''Dutchman's'' decks, he cursed the winds (and God himself). Vowing if it takes all eternity , he would remain at sea and n'er enter a Port or Harbor until he completed his boast!'' Therein lies the curse. He and his Ship would sail for all eternity, never being allowed to enter Port until he could complete his mission (which the winds would NOT allow). Any ship that came across The Dutchman would have bad luck on their voyage. Further, (as some of the stories go)  The Dutchman will try to stop a ship begging them take letters and notes for them to shore (written to long dead relatives and friends). Any Captain foolish enough to undertake this favor, would doom his crew and ship to founder (and sink!). Yet another version . This version has our Captain having falsely accusing a true love of infidelity  brutally murders her (stabbed through the heart). Escaping to his ship, he sails away (escaping justice). Cursed to sail the seas until the end of time, he was allowed to visit a Port once every 100 years (for a day). His mission is to find a true love to sacrifice herself (in exchange for his soul). Some have claimed to have seen The Dutchman as late as the 1940s.

 

                                                                                The_Flying_Dutchman.jpg

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''THE WILD HUNT''

A common legend told in Europe is ''The Wild Hunt''. Seen by the fortunate (or unfortunate) - a group of spectral Huntsmen are often seen in the early morning sky (or evening sky). Cursed to forever hunt and elusive ghostly prey, to see the Riders could be bad luck or a portent of one's much needed redemption. Sometimes seen as demons, the exact nature of being selected for The Hunt is lost. Perhaps cruel techniques or practices, - perhaps an evil or unproductive life. All of these are likely causes. In America, the legend evolved into ''The Ghost Riders''. A group of Cowboys (cursed to ride ''The Devil's Range'') - must for all eternity try to catch The Devil's Herd. Seeing them was a living Cowboy's so called Last Chance - to live a good life. ''Do you hear galloping, or is it Me?''

 

                                                       The_Wild_Hunt_1.jpg       The_Wild_Hunt_2.jpg

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''MEDUSA''

From 3rd Century B.C. - Greece comes The Gorgon known as ''Medusa''. Gorgons were mythical female monsters, born from The Gods Phorcys and Ceto. There were initially 3 (Stheno, Euryale and of course, Medusa). Originally (as the legend goes), Medusa was the only one who was not immortal. Medusa was not originally cursed for her beauty (that comes later). She and her sisters were beautiful, but their hairdo featured a mane of serpents. Now, as per the original text , Medusa has relations with the God Poseidon (right smack in the middle of The Temple of The Goddess, Minerva). This so enrages Minerva, that she allowed Medusa to retain her beauty  but, any man foolish enough to gaze upon her would be instantly turned to stone  forever. Banished to the Island of Cestros, Medusa guarded Minerva's treasures. Naturally, brave and daring men would attempt to steal the treasure. Naturally, they all were turned to stone. Enter the hero Perseus. Using divine gifts from the gods, Perseus used a polished shield to maintain Medusa's position in his sight (apparently turning to stone doesn't work with reflections). At the right moment, Persus cuts off Medusa's head. Endgame. MUCH of the Medusa story was taken and changed by our friends The Romans. Most later Western Greek Historians tended to chose their version, as it was much more daring and exciting. The Gorgon creature would continue as a horror story for many centuries (remember, Medusa had 2 immortal sisters). This had been fodder more many books and movies over the centuries. Some more contemporary versions have our immortal gals able to appear (outwardly at least), as beautiful women. They trap handsome and rich men and then (of course) reveal their true selves.

 

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''TIAMAT''

From Ancient Sumeria, come The Legend of ''Tiamat''. Born of unspecified origins, Tiamat and her husband Abzu, were responsible for creating many of The Oceans creatures (their offspring). Another God (Aspu) kills Tiamat's husband. She took the form of a multi-headed Sea Monster Dragon. Taking her revenge and killing Aspu, he begins to create more of her kind. She replaced their blood with pure poison.Eventually slain by Aspu's Son (who used her split in half body to make the heavens and the earth). Tiamat is the Mother of All Dragons. These new offspring would live eternally bringing destruction to all (and become a popular Medieval pastime for the Art of Slaying).

 

                                                                   Tiamat.jpg

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UBUME

From 12th Century Japan, comes the Tale of ''Ubume''. Near The Kyoto River is a stone bridge. Travelers often see an old woman holding an infant (and peering into the water, intently. She will plead with the passerby to hold the child.....for only a moment. When the helpful stranger does, the old woman vanishes. Naturally, the passerby begins to carry the child to safety (or to Authorities). With every step, the child (swaddled), becomes heavier and heavier, until one can no longer hold it. Upon placing the child on the ground (and unwrapping it) a large rock is revealed. It was said that an evil Shogun wanted his bridge blessed. So, he had Ubume and her child killed and buried under the pillars of the bridge (as a sacrifice to the Shogun's Gods). Her Ghost appears looking for help......forever!

 

                                                                                        Ubume.jpg

 

 

 

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''LILITH''

Long forgotten by many, ''Lilith'' is technically the apex of Monsters. She was of course, The Mother of All Monsters. Seen originally in Jewish mythology, Lilith (or a character like her), even has been found in Ancient Sumerian cuniform text. As for her Jewish traditions, The Alphabet of Sirach, which dates from 700 B.C. Tells her story. Lilith was really Adam's (Garden of Eden)  first wife. Made from the same earth as Adam was, she too was made by God to be subservient to Adam. This she refused. In fact, she ran away from Adam and left The Garden of Eden (which is why God created a different approach with regards to Eve!). Lilith eventually meets with (and has relations with The Archangel Samael). Samael has various associations (both of which, depending on your religion, may be good or evil). In Christianity, Samael is a fallen Angel. Their offspring were cursed (of course), by God as (what for it)  Monsters. These children will eventually form the basis for Vampires, Werewolves and every other nasty Haunts in The World.

 

                                                                                   Lilith.jpg

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''KRAKEN''

Known throughout Sailor legends for centuries, The ''Kraken'' (despite Hollywood's attempt to make it Greek), was actually based on Norwegian and Greenland myth. These sea monsters were described as enormous Octopus-like creatures (big enough to pull down a 300 foot ships easily). Sizes of 40 and 60 feet tall (rising from the sea), were told. As early as the 13th Century, The Kraken was talked about. Many sailors claimed to have seen Kraken attacks (or had survived one). By the 19th Century, Kraken sightings had changed somewhat. Now, these sea monsters were crab-like in appearance. Kraken's became so popular again, that even Jules Verne included the theory of the Kraken as the reason ships were being destroyed in his novel 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (which we know that Nemo's submarine got all the press). Still, as modern Oceanography has shown, Giant Squid and other unknown lifeforms are constantly being discovered in the Oceans of The World. Without proper scientific equipment and investigation, the ancients could easily assign the title Monster to these huge sea beasts.

 

                                                                                           Kraken.jpg

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''MOOQUI''

From Central America, come The ''Mooqui''. These devilish, Goblin-like creatures live in the many Mines found in South America (especially Peru and Columbia). They never venture out. They are said to be 2 feet tall and have a larger than normal head. They have no neck and pointy ears and are very pale due to lack of sunlight. They use pick-axe and shovel and seem intent on digging. If they catch humans digging in their territory they will attack and kill the trespasser (often without a body being recovered). Continued invasion warrants The Mooqui to attack your village and possibly taking away your children. Many Modern Historians link The Mooqui to the fact than many Miners use Cocoa to continue their long and hard work (and that The Mooqui is simply a hallucination). However, The Mooqui have been around since The Incans so............

 

                                                                        Mooqui.jpg

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''DREKAVAC''

From Serbia, comes The ''Drekavac''. The legend seems to have developed in the 11th Century. Described as long and gaunt, with a overly large head, this humanoid creature appears as a deformed child. It has also been seen as a canine-type creature with kangaroo legs. In the form of a child, it can be found near graveyards, begging passerby's to baptize it. As the story goes, if one does not - it has a horrifying loud shriek. Apparently, The Drekavac is a combination creature composed of the unbaptized souls of unborn or young children. The Drekavac is scared of dogs (who are apt to alert humans to their presence). Seen especially around the Christian Observance of Christmas Tide. Obviously, The Drekavac is Serbia's version of Scotland's Banshee (maybe even a supernatural relative, of sorts). Being a Medieval legend, it is seldom seen (or even heard of now). But, one can always go walking by a Serbian graveyard in a couple of months and see.......

 

                                                                          Drekavac.jpg

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''ADAR LLWCH GWIN''

Descended from The Griffin Family, This Welsh Monster Legend involved the Ancient Welsh hero Drudwas ap Tryffin. He was given a flock of these part-Eagle, Lion, Bird and Bear creatures (as a wedding gift from his Wife's Father (she was a Fairy). The Adar Llwch Gwin was super intelligent and could understand the language of man. Once a Master/Owner relationship was established, The Adar would follow his command to the letter. Tryffin developed a dislike for another great hero (Arthur - yes that one). Challenged to combat (of which Arthur accepted), Tryffin ordered his Adar's to attack and kill the first human they saw. He sent them off to await Arthur (ambush). Unfortunately for Tryffin, Arthur was late. Upon Tryffin's arrival -  his Adar attacked, and tore him to pieces!. The legend and story (sometimes altered to fit the Period), had been around since at least the 9th Century. The term Adar came to be used in The Middle Ages to describe birds of prey (Hawks and related Raptors).

 

                                                                                 Adar_Llwch_Gwin.jpg

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''THE HEADLESS HORSEMAN''

A VERY popular American legend (especially around the Halloween Season of October), deals with a short story written by Washington Irving (in 1820). According to legend, it was set during The American Revolutionary War. British Forces regularly employed German Mercenaries (known as Hessians or sometimes Jagers). Born fighters (and having a reputation for ruthlessness), one such Hessian Commander was particularly cruel to any American Colonial he encountered in battle. During The Battle of White Plains (Upstate New York, 1777), this Hessian Commander finally got his ''come upings'' and was killed (beheaded, actually). Many years later, local residents of the nearby Village of Sleepy Hollow found the skeleton and buried it. They however, never found his skull. Next, (as all legends do go), a black spectral horse with a mounted (headless, of course) German soldier, - waving his saber  was seen galloping along the backroads. If one was seen by the ''Headless Horseman'', they had to flee for their lives -  least he caught them and removed their head to replace the one that he had lost! The legend was incorporated in a story dealing with a mild mannered (and cowardly) hero named Ichabod Crane, who in love with the local Village vixen (who happens to also be the love interest of the Village Bully, Bram Bones). Bram notes that our girl (Christina), likes ''smart guys''. So, to remove his rival, Bram dresses up as The Horseman (complete with glowing Jack-O-Lantern), to scare Ichabod away. Unfortunately for Mr. Crane, the real Horseman comes along. If you are not familiar with the ending.......Read The Story! HA HA HA!

 

                                                                                The_Headless_Horseman.jpg

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''VRYKOLAKAS''

These nasty Greek demons are akin to two mythical monsters -  Werewolves and Vampires. Going back as far as the 17th Century, The ''Vrykolakas'' were humans that led a sinful life and buried in unconsecrated ground. Often they would return as a wolf-like vampire creature. Unlike a traditional vampire, they are very large and heavy. They will creep into a victims house and lay on their body draining the energy of the unfortunate. The victim cannot move during the attack (but is aware it is happening!). Sometimes, Vrykolakas will knock once on their victims door. Upon opening the door, one finds no one there. Our new visitor is invisible (of course), and simply waits for you to go to sleep. They are killed much like a traditional vampire. Beheading, staking -  but most popularly, cremating the Vrykolaka while it rests in it's grave (only on Saturdays). To this day, many small Villages in Greece will NOT answer their door on the FIRST knock.

 

                                                                         Vrykolakas.jpg

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''BOO HAG''

A tale from African-American Gullah Culture (Gullahs were descendants of African Southern Slaves from South Carolina and Georgia) - comes ''The Boo Hag''. The story comes in around the 18th Century (and is still somewhat active today). The legend states that The Boo Hag is a vampire-like evil spirit. Unlike a traditional blood-drinker, Boo Hags suck the breath (or energy) from their victims. They wear the skins of some of their victims (having no skin of their own). Often, once a suitable victim is picked, The Boo Hag will gain access (through a crack in the door or wall). She floats above the victim when they are asleep. Putting the victim into a dream filled sleep, she sucks some (not all) of their breath (energy) from them. The Boo Hag will do this many times (over many weeks). IF the victim fights through his dreams and wakes up, The Boo Hag will take their skin. Boo Hags wear their skins until they are no longer suitable for use (decomposing). They must replace the skin always before daylight light -  least they be trapped without skin -  forever. Another Boo Hag trick, is to ride their victims. A victim will feel an unusual weight on their back (from time to time). This is a Boo Hag. A known tactic to rid and or confuse a Boo Hag, is to place a broom by your bed before you go to sleep at night. An attacking Boo Hag MUST stop and count all the straws (bristles). By the time she does, it is close to morning, and she must go.

 

                                                                         Boo_Hag.jpg

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''THE LEGEND OF FAUST''

A popular cautionary tale from Medieval Germany is ''Faust''. The story had been adapted MANY times and in many Countries. It has been made into songs, operas and of course - movies. The tale tells of a scholar named Faust. Old and learned, he is tired of wasting his life on pursuits of the mind. He foolishly makes a pact with The Devil. Faust will give his soul over, if The Devil will give him all knowledge and worldly pleasures (particularly the love of a young girl he has his eye on). The contract with ''Old Scratch'' is supposed to last for 24 years. Unfortunately for Faust, The Devil manipulates time so that 1 hour equals 1 year! So Faust only has one day. Getting all he asked for with predictable hollow endings - results in Faust realizing the folly of his deal. The Devil takes his soul in the end. The story has been changed (from time to time) with the same morale ending. Be happy with what you have (or have not). Sometimes things (and experiences) are fleeting.

 

                                                                                   The_Legend_of_Faust.jpg

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''WHIPPING TOM AND SKIPPING JOAN''

Another frightening story from the late-Middle Ages (and England)  is the tale of ''Whipping Tom''. Seen in 1672, Tom was an attacker of women. He would prowl the streets and alleys of London (and the nearby Village of Hackney). Upon a violent approach, Tom would produce a small whip and proceed to beat the lower extremities of mainly women. Tom was known to vanish into thin air or into a pillar of smoke. As many as 40 women were brutally assaulted. Tom also was known to shout the single phrase ''Spanko!'' Some say Tom had a helper known as ''Skipping Joan''. Although several suspects were arrested and imprisoned, the attacks didn't stop. Again in 1714, a series of Whipping Tom attacks once again happened. This madman - identified as Thomas Wallis, confessed to whipping 100 women. The attacks stopped when Wallis was put in prison. Still, imagine walking down a dark and foggy alley and seeing the fleeting image of a man running up to you yelling ''Spanko!'' - or a demonic figure of a skipping girl approaching...............

 

                                                                                   Whipping_Tom.jpg

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''THE WANDERING JEW''

Possibly many thousands of years old, this story was popular in Medieval Europe. As the legend goes, Christ fell while carrying his Cross. He fell in front of a Jewish Cobbler's Shop. Annoyed that his business was suffering, the foolish Merchant chastised Jesus, yelling at him to move faster and away from the front of his shop. Christ said (so the story goes), that he would move on, but that the Cobbler would endure until the last day. From that day forward, the Cobbler could not die. Being immortal, he wandered the World (still practicing his trade). Anyone foolish enough to buy a pair of his shoes or have any work done  would have bad luck (even death), befall them. The story and subsequent sightings go well into the 19th Century. It is certain, the story was cultivated by European populations who were prompted by The Catholic Church to shun and despise Jews (evidenced by the horrible persecutions against them in The Middle Ages). Still, wonder the next time you go to get a heel repaired from a ''Mister Stein'' (it's just a story anyway ).

 

                                                                                      The_Wandering_Jew.jpg

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''FRANKENSTEIN''

The Screen version of Mary Shelley's 1818 Horror Novel, was first put to film in 1910. Financed by Thomas Edison, the silent film ran for a mere 16-minutes. It was almost completely re-written (and bears only a slight resemblance to the book). Although, as with the book, it features an idealist Doctor who (intent on creating life from death)  gathers pieces of dead humans (arms, legs, internal organs etc). Sewing them together, he uses electricity to re-animate his creation  to horrible results. The Creature (shunned for his ugly and frightful appearance)  goes on a rampage. Wishing a mate (something of his own kind), he tried to manipulate our Doctor (with his own fiance). The Edison movie ends with the Monster being nothing but our good Doctors reflection (possibly alluding to his personality, ala Jekyll and Hyde). Another attempt was made in 1915 with Life Without Soul. This version was a whopping 70-minutes long (so long it was broken down into 5 parts). The Monster was depicted more as a Brutish Beast. It was not until 1931 (and the advent of Talkies just a few years prior) - that the first true Frankenstein Monster debuted. An unknown British Actor named Boris Karloff was projected into the starlight for his portrayal of Frankenstein's Monster. His image would serve as the template for most future versions of The Creation. Lucrative for The Studios, Frankenstein's Monster would be the fodder for 7 sequels (although Karloff only did 3). Although by 1956, our poor Monster had pretty much been worn out with audiences Worldwide. That was until a small (and relatively unknown independent Film Studio named Hammer, came along). Again, taking an unknown actor named Christopher Lee, Hammer Studios filmed and released The Curse of Frankenstein (1957). Different from other filmed versions, Hammer shocked their audiences with copious amounts of stage blood and terrifying make-up effects. Fans loved it. The Monster was again reborn. Hammer launches a series of 5 films between 1956 and 1970 (some scary some attempting humor. American film companies were not undone either. Our Monster was transformed into an alien, a hormone infused teenager- even a female monster/Jack The Ripper type! The Japanese also took a stab at our hero, turning him into a gigantic (of course), beast that fights himself. It was not until 1994, that a half-hearted attempt to remake the film as close to the novel was made. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein featured an unusual casting of American Gangster portrayer icon Robert DeNiro as The Monster. Many critics still felt the story did not hit the mark. The last attempt was the 2014  I, Frankenstein loosely based on a graphic novel which meshes The Frankenstein legend with a more supernatural overtone.

 

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''HYDRA''

From Ancient Greece comes The Hydra. Born of two Gods (Typhon and Echidna). This serpent-like creature was said to be over 100 feet long. It possessed many heads, each shaped like a dragon. It's blood was so poisonous and dangerous, that it's mere odor could stop attackers. Further, if an attacker did get close enough to lop of a head, 2 identical ones would instantly grow to replace it. The Hydra lived in Lake Lerna (an isolated island in The Mediterranean Sea). Incredibly strong, it was said no mortal man could slay The Hydra. The hero Hercules (half-God), was given the job of killing The Hydra as part of his quest, The 12 Labors. The Hydra blood (though dangerous), was needed to kill another immortal beast. Hercules (using a Scythe), cut off all heads but one (at the same time). This severely weakened The Hydra so that it could not replace it' many missing heads at one time.

 

                                                                             Hydra.jpg

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''CYCLOPS''

Yet another legendary mythic creature from Ancient Greece was the ''Cyclops''. Offspring of Poseidon, these gigantic creatures were humanoid in appearance. Said to be 50 feet tall and incredibly strong, their only flaw - was that they had but one, giant eye (on their forehead) with which to see! Although a group (brothers, really) lived on The Cyclopean Island (it's real name and location, unknown), the real job of The Cyclops was to guard the Gates to Tartarus. Most of their known legend, comes from Greek Writer Homer. His story of The Odyssey (which tells the story of Odysseus), tells of how Odysseus and his crew are trapped in a cave on The Cyclops Island. Facing death (The Cyclops was hungry), they used trickery to lure the Cyclops to sleep. They managed to blind the giant beast and escape. The Cyclops has been depicted in many other Greek stories (as well as Roman tales). The image of this monster (although altered by Period), always features it's enormous one eye. Often it is paired with the body of a horse (in Roman versions).

 

                                                                                            Cyclops.jpg

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''TROLL''

These popular legendary creatures have been talked about (and seen), in just about every Country and culture on The Planet. First seen in Nordic saga (around the 8th Century), ''Trolls'' were humanoid creatures that were very much smaller that a regular man. Often said to be 2 to 4 feet tall, (as small) to 6 foot tall for the bigger breeds) - they possessed green or dark faces and often were covered in warts. They were known to dress as common people. Trolls like to live in dark and isolated places. In Norse stories, Trolls lived high in isolated mountains. When the legend spread, (Germany, Scotland etc). - Trolls were found to live under bridges (and to guard their property to the death  of the trespasser). Trolls do not like humans (and try to avoid them at all costs). However, their knowledge of healing is much greater than humans. Often Shaman and Healers went to great length to find them. Capturing a Troll was extremely difficult. Any exposure to sunlight caused a Troll to turn to stone. That coupled with the fact that a deal had to be made with the Troll (often involving giving away one's own child as payment). Trolls were thought to be the evolution towards legends involving Elves and Leprechauns.

 

                                                                                     Troll.jpg

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